Tag Archives: life

Kitna Deti Hai in Real Life !!!

If you happen to watch Maruti car advertisements in the last decade they would usually have the “Kitna Deti hai” (How much average does this give)  advertisement campaign.

Kitna Deti Hai

     Kitna Deti Hai

Like most Indians I too am concerned about the average my car gives before buying. But this Saturday visit to Fiat Wheels Showroom at Mohali for servicing of my car was an eye opener to how much people take this “car average” issue seriously. Talking to sales team about customer choices these days, the guys shared am amazing incident on this theme.

A customer had ordered a new car for around 7 lacs(10000$) and at the time of delivery the dealer filled the car with around 5 liters of diesel. As the car company claims the average around 20 km per liter the customer who hailed from Ambala(Around 90 km from Chandigarh)calculated he could reach Ambala with the said amount of Diesel. The dealer specifically asked him to get the car filled with diesel and then proceed to his hometown. After around one hour of delivery, the salesman received the call from the customer that car had stopped midway and diesel was empty and he did not have anyone for help. So he asked him for help and the dealer responded and the salesman reached the spot after about an hour with diesel.

The incident is a glowing example of how good we are at mathematics and how little misery on the customer’s part can spoil his fun. Just imagine having spent 7 lacs (10,000$) on the car and then avoided 2500 Rupees (30$) for a full tank.

The scenario can be projected to the life of many people where we spend stupendous amount on buying the thing but when it comes to maintenance/annual service we aren’t very keen unless the item is giving us a problem.

Kitna Deti hai

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under advertisement, attitude, life, Opinion

A pleasant surprise !!!!

Time Flies Fast is an age old saying.
You start realizing more of these age old quotes wisdom as you enter thirties and henceforth the rest of your life. !!!
And meeting your old school pals brings forth those cherished memories that are close to your heart. New Year brought in a pleasant surprise when I received a call from Hitesh.It has been more than 12 years since we last met. He was posted in Japan with Samsung. He is still as slim as he was a decade back .His style which I appreciated the most about him since my school days is intact. I must thank him for the gesture of taking time for planning this visit to my place .

And yes I truly agree with Hitesh that after meeting , we are now just not dormant Facebook contacts.

Varun also visited probably after a gap of three years. His IAS exam has taken a toll over his stylish hair. But I bet people could sport Anupam Kher hairstyle for rest of their lives if someone would assure them of clearing the exam. Luckily Varun has managed to clear IAS without that.
It was very heartening to meet after so long. The time just flew as we were recalling those years .It just seem yesterday while were discussing and yet it seemed so much had happened in our lives during those years.Zorawar was also exited meeting them and he would pop in a few thoughts here and there to let us know .
Time flies over us, but leaves it shadow behind

A mini Reunion

Leave a comment

Filed under friends, life, precious moments, reunion

A walk down the memory lane-Shimla

Time flies on restless pinions — constant never

It was around 20 years back, when I had left Shimla and all this time I never got a chance to visit it again until this summer. It is a wonderful place and I have always have been in love with this place ever since I first visited it. I got an opportunity to stay at this place when my father was posted at Shimla in 1993-94 and have my 5th and 6th standard from this place. I had studied in Chapslle Gaden School, near Lakkar Bazar and during this visit I decided to revisit my school and revive the good old memories. This school has had an impact on my education and I was deeply impressed by my Principal Madam who also happened to be my English teacher at that time. It was probably because of her efforts and continued insistence that I developed a knack of expressing my ideas through writing .She had always encouraged us to write independently on new essay topics and would not appreciate if we would copy from essay books or other available sources. school This time I met her after 20 years and it was an awesome moment .She looked as charismatic as ever and I was touched by her hospitality .The feelings are hard to express in words. I also met Mrs Dogra Vice principal at that time and it was really wonderful to meet her. Principal MadamclassroomDogra Madam Visiting my school revived my old memories, my classroom, and the swing where I would spend hours after school with my friend Rajan .It was all so awesome. The experience was doubled as my wife and son Mantej were accompanying me. swing

In the words of Charles Dickens: The pain of parting is nothing to the joy of meeting again.

1 Comment

Filed under journey, life, memory, precious moments, school, visit

The Paradoxical Commandments

by Kent M. Keith

People are illogical, unreasonable, and self-centered.
Love them anyway.

If you do good, people will accuse you of selfish ulterior motives.
Do good anyway.

If you are successful, you will win false friends and true enemies.
Succeed anyway.

The good you do today will be forgotten tomorrow.
Do good anyway.

Honesty and frankness make you vulnerable.
Be honest and frank anyway.

The biggest men and women with the biggest ideas can be shot down by the smallest men and women with the smallest minds.
Think big anyway.

People favor underdogs but follow only top dogs.
Fight for a few underdogs anyway.

What you spend years building may be destroyed overnight.
Build anyway.

People really need help but may attack you if you do help them.
Help people anyway.

Give the world the best you have and you’ll get kicked in the teeth.
Give the world the best you have anyway.

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Death, honest, Inspiration, life, love, Opinion, paradox, people, poem, poetry, secret, success

Anesthesia Vs. Anaesthesia: Does It Really Matter?

Ashish Khanna, 1998 batch

Connections-May 2013 (Volume 10, Issue 2) 

The Oxford dictionary definition of Anaesthesia is “insensitivity to pain, especially as artificially induced by the administration of gases or the injection of drugs before surgical operations”. The Merriam-Webster dictionary defines Anesthesia as “loss of sensation and usually of consciousness without loss of vital functions artificially produced by the administration of one or more agents that block the passage of pain impulses along nerve pathways to the brain” Synonymous: yes?

Anyone would agree that the difference between Anaesthesia (British English) versus Anesthesia  (American English) is above and beyond the addition of a single alphabet of the English language. I started my journey as an anesthesia resident in a country where Anaesthesia was the correctly spelt version of the branch of medicine that dealt with this specialty. Today, three years after re-training the art and re-learning Anaesthesia to be spelt as Anesthesia in the United States, it is time to look back and ponder on the finer points.
The decision to leave your own country after finishing a residency always comes with a pinch of salt. As you look to expand your clinical and academic training beyond the horizon, you are faced with the uncertainty of the unexpected. The challenge is a system of medicine distinctly different from your home country and a culture to healthcare that demands considerable understanding. A question that I am very often faced with when I make my frequent trips back home is “What is different about Anesthesia practice in the United States?” It might come as a surprise to a lot of people if I say “nothing at all” in reply. Well, what is different is not Anesthesia or Anaesthesia, only the fine print!! The other very frequent question that is thrown at me is the almost rhetorical “Is it better there?” Let me step back today and say let’s keep all this better – worse talk aside. It never was and it will never be fair to compare two vastly different systems of medicine. As I direct this piece of writing to those friends of mine who are faced with doubts and internal struggles before they leave the comfort of their own homes I would like to emphasize one singular fact: forget about quality of medicine or quality of life and remember the biggest challenge is the ability to train to re-train or put
in more simple words another residency program after a prior residency in your home country. Starting a residency program in Anesthesia under the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation, I realized early on that the essence of getting the most out of this education is to wipe my slate clean and restart again. Tell the world that you are trained in your specialty in your own country and you are capable of doing your thing does provide you with the much-needed independence of clinical work at times, but can be your worst
enemy if you want to acquire new knowledge. It is important to understand that there will be days where the attending will hold your hand when you are doing a procedure that you have done so many times before or might tell you that “this is the way it is done here”. Days, when you need to keep you’re your ego at home. Days when you will feel your neurons are struggling to cope with erasing old skills and acquiring new skills for the same procedures again. But, hey did you want to  do things the way you were doing them in your own country? That said, what is the reason you
made this trip across 4000+ miles half way across the planet? The answer to these questions will help you understand that unless you let your guard down in a foreign land and show that you are an open book you will never learn anything new and in essence never grow as a clinician. Medicine is repetitive science; it is very easy to be lulled into a false sense of satisfaction practicing the same
things over and over again, the same very way every day. The only way to appropriately imbibe your area of expertise and to mature as a clinician is to step out and see what else can be done differently and is being done differently. My message here is not to train in the United States after training in India, but to train at different places and in that process acquire a new set of skills all the time.
Going further, another area of distress for the physician from India as he or she steps onto alien soil is the cultural aspect of medicine. The interaction between peer groups as resident doctors and patient physicians as healthcare providers is different to say the least. As you move away from the “yes sir/ma’am” policy to “yes Dr. XYZ” even when that Dr. XYZ might be your department chair, you will quickly realize that you have to prove your worth as a resident by the sheer quality of your work and not the weight of your courtesy and multiple salutations directed to your staff. Decision making for the betterment of your patient is another area where the young resident here is thrown into the deep end every single day. An ICU attending will ask you for your plan, and so will your anesthesia attending in the operating room. And yes, your plan will be plan that will be executed as long as you can justify it. And that holds true for every provider from the lowest level of an intern to upwards.
Protecting patient privacy and respecting that the patient is the true owner of his or her healthcare information is another moot point here. Not to discuss patients with names or anything that could identify them, not to talk about them in the hospital corridors or the escalators is a habit that is difficult to get rid of. The tendency to try to force your decision as a clinician on the patient or the patient’s family is also something that we live by all the time in India. The patient is the master of his/her own destiny here and whether it be morbid obesity, chronic smoking in a vasculopath or narcotic abuse in a chronic pain patient, your job will be to ask them whether they feel they can change theirlifestyleand not to enforce that change on them. Difficult times will also revolve around “End-of-Life” decisions in the ICU and DNR (Do Not Resuscitate) statuses. The ability of families here to think very practically for their dying loved ones and to let go of them when there is point of futility, is commonplace. Another challenge that is
beyond the understanding of anesthesia and different from back home, and is something that you
have to deal with on a regular basis.
How can I forget to include in my set of challenges also, the change from using pharmaceuticals as brand names versus names of salts back home. Or the different abbreviations that come inherent with another healthcare system. Yes, I gave my senior resident a quizzical look when he said “Did you tube your patient” ( a.k.a intubation) or “Can you do the A-line first?” ( a.k.a arterial line) or “ Is he off the vent ?” (weaning from the ventilator) or “When is your ICU patient going to the sniff?” (a.k.a skilled nursing facility). There are numerous more such which define the distinct cultural differences in healthcare here in the United States.
As I look back today, I know that things have evolved for me as a clinician but also more importantly as a human being. I look at medicine differently; I look and understand a patient’s emotions differently. That to me is the pivotal change. For all those fellow friends who are getting ready to step out on this often-treaded path of training in another country after training as a specialist in India, I hope this writing will give a better idea of what to expect. All said and done, the
difference is not in quality of healthcare or the quality of life that you can expect to live, but in what you can assimilate from the new system of medicine.

In the end, it is not Anesthesia versus Anaesthesia, and it really does not matter!

Dr.Khanna

1 Comment

Filed under Anesthesia, attitude, GMCH, health, humor, life, Residency, USMLE

Technology That Touches Lives – Everywhere !!!

tombstone

Headstone of Internet Era

A wonderful cartoon depicting how the future gravestones on this technocratic generation would like .

Perfect example of “Technology That Touches Lives – Everywhere

Leave a comment

Filed under cartoon, Death, gravestone, humor, imagination, Life and Death, technology

Your Safety Our Concern !!!!

Animals police

Traffic Controllers ??

Leave a comment

Filed under attitude, Bizzare, dog, effort, funny, humor, life, news, pets, safety, WORK