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Bells-Palsy Exercises

Bell’s palsy is a condition in which the muscles on one side of your face become weak or paralyzed. It affects only one side of the face at a time, causing it to droop or become stiff on that side.

It’s caused by some kind of trauma to the seventh cranial nerve. This is also called the “facial nerve.” Bell’s palsy can happen to anyone. But it seems to occur more often in people who have diabetes or are recovering from viral infections.

Things to do in the first 6 weeks:

Massage the face with strokes towards the ear.

  • Support the cheek with the hand whilst talking – this will make the B and P sounds clearer. While on the phone for example, you may want to press your hand against your cheek, thereby mimicking the tension that would normally be in your muscles.
  • Take care to keep the affected side of the mouth clean. Lodged food, lack of saliva and taste to that side of the mouth can cause problems. You may want to use a mouthwash. Try to chew on both sides of the mouth taking care not to bite your tongue or cheek.
  • Try not to increase movement on the good side of the face.
  • If necessary use a straw to drink. Try to put it to the centre of the mouth, completing the lip seal with finger pressure.
  • Take plenty of rest when you feel tired. The sooner your body fights off the virus the quicker things can start to recover.
  • Take good care of the eye, it cannot blink, close or water properly, and it is vulnerable to damage. Use eye drops, tape the eye closed at night or whenever it feels sore, and protect it from draughts by wearing glasses. You may need to wear dark glasses when in bright light or sunlight for eye protection. Get professional help if ever the eye feels sore.

Exercises following Bell’s Palsy

Massage

Do not begin any exercises for the face until there are visible signs that the nerve is sending signals to the muscles.

However, it is safe to start some gentle massage:

Using your fingers, massage and gently stretch the skin from the corner of your mouth towards the ear and then down to the jaw bone in a circular pattern

Do the same circular pattern on your chin and forehead.

With your finger (make-up brush / ice cube) brush forehead in an upward direction towards the hairline, 2 – 3 times. Do the same with the cheek area, or try gentle tapping on the skin with your fingertips.

Exercises

Preferably do the exercises in front of a mirror and concentrate on which muscles are trying to work.

If the ‘good’ side overworks or movements become too exaggerated, then stop and make the movements smaller.

Exercise in short sessions but repeat the routine 2 – 3 times a day.

Quality important than quantity.

  • Wrinkle forehead into a frown
  • Close eyes slowly
  • Gently wink with one eye. Repeat with other
  • Wrinkle up nose as if you have smelt something horrible
  • Open mouth wide as if to say “ahh”
  • Pucker lips and push forwards as if to say “ooo”
  • Smile without showing teeth; then smile showing teeth
  • Puff cheeks out with air – hold lips shut so that no air escapes. Hold for 3 – 5 seconds
  • Compress lips together
  • Practice reading / speaking out loud, carefully sounding out the words
  • Don’t chew gum as this exercises the wrong muscles.

face-exercises

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Diet For Gout Patients

What is gout?

Gout is a type of arthritis. It is caused by having too much of the chemical, uric acid, in your bloodstream.

Uric acid is the waste product created when the body breaks down purines (a type of
protein found in many foods and all of your cells).

Increased levels of uric acid in your blood may occur if, for example, your kidneys cannot efficiently remove it, you have a rare genetic abnormality, or because your diet and lifestyle increase the amount of uric acid that you produce.

If levels of uric acid are high for prolonged periods, needle-like crystals can start to form in your tissues, resulting in swollen, painful joints.
Your diet plays an important role in both causing gout and reducing the likelihood of suffering further painful attacks of gout.

If you already suffer from gout, eating a diet that is rich in purines can
result in a five-fold increase in gout attacks.

Are other illnesses associated with the development of gout?

Elevated uric acid is seen in many other conditions, and people who have gout may also have raised cholesterol, raised triglycerides (a type of fat in your blood), high blood pressure and poor glucose tolerance.
This may make it more likely that you have (or will develop) type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome and kidney disease.
In addition, approximately half of all gout sufferers are overweight.
Central obesity (carrying weight around your middle) also increases certain inflammatory substances in your blood. This can further exacerbate gout attacks, as well as putting you at risk of developing heart disease, diabetes and metabolic syndrome.

 Can losing weight help my gout?

Losing weight alone can reduce blood uric acid levels, and the number of acute attacks suffered.
Weight-loss will also help to reduce the stress on weight–bearing joints e.g. hips, knees, ankles and feet.
However, it is important to avoid any type of crash dieting, as going without food for
long periods and rapid loss of weight can increase uric acid levels and trigger painful gout attacks.
A combination of balanced healthy eating and regular physical activity is the best way to lose weight safely and maintain a healthy weight

Which foods should be avoided?

As uric acid is made in the body from the breakdown of purines that
come from your diet, it is advisable to reduce the amounts of foods
that you eat that are high purines.

High purine foods include: (avoid)

•Offal – liver and kidneys, heart and sweetbreads

•Oily fish -anchovies, herring, mackerel, sardines, sprats, whitebait

Seafood – especially mussels, crab, shrimps and other shellfish, fish roe, caviar

Moderate purine foods (eat in moderation)

•Meat- beef, lamb chicken, pork
•Poultry- chicken and duck
•Dried peas, beans and legumes- baked beans, kidney beans, soya beans and peas etc.
•Mushrooms
•Some vegetables- asparagus, cauliflower, spinach
•Wholegrains- bran, oatbran,wholemeal bread

Low purine foods

•Dairy- milk, cheese, yoghurt, butter
•Eggs
•Bread and cereals- (except wholegrain)
•Pasta and noodles
•Fruit and vegetables

 

How much protein do you need?

Generally you need about 1g of protein per kg of body weight (70kg man only requires 70g of protein daily), unless you on a protein restricted diet e.g., some people with kidney disease may need to restrict their intake.

Are there any foods that are good for gout?

Studies have shown that men whose diet is higher in vitamin C are less likely to develop gout.
Also, taking additional vitamin C as a dietary supplement (500 to 1500mg/day) can reduce blood uric acid levels.This is achieved by helping to remove uric acid from the
body via the kidneys.
If you’re considering supplementing your diet, always discuss this with your doctor as vitamin C can (rarely) interact with prescribed medications.
High doses of vitamin C can also cause loose stools in some people.

Eating healthily is key

Eating a balanced diet is important for everyone. A healthy diethelps to control weight and provides all the necessary nutrients needed for maintaining good health.
A variety of foods from the four main food groups should be eaten every day, this means:
•Plenty of fruit and vegetables
– it’s very important to achieve at least 5-a-day, as fruit and vegetables provide fibre, vitamins, minerals and phyto nutrients essential for good health
Plenty of bread, other cereals and potatoes
– try to eat some whole grains, and use the skin on potatoes to ensure you get the vitamins, mineral and fibre you need
Moderate amounts of meat, fish and alternatives
– avoid eating large portions – beware restaurants often serve 8oz of meat
for a main
Moderate amounts of dairy products
– the recommended amount is three portions of dairy products daily e.g. 200 ml glass of milk, a pot of yoghurt and a 30 mg (matchbox-sized) piece of hard cheese
Reduce or eliminate highly processed foods and drinks

Should I drink lots of water?

Yes, drinking fluids reduces the likelihood of crystals forming in the kidneys. As a general rule, drinking 8 large glasses of fluids a day (1.5 litres) is recommended. All drinks, except alcohol, count towards your fluid intake, including caffeine-containing drinks such as tea and coffee. Caffeine can act as a mild diuretic, which means it causes you
to pass urine more often.

Can I drink alcohol?

Drinking alcohol can increase your risk of developing gout and can bring on a sudden attack if you are already a gout sufferer. Alcohol can raise the level of uric acid in the blood in a number of ways and so trigger a gout attack. Many beers contain large quantities of purines from the fermenting process and alcohol stimulates the production of uric acid by the liver. More importantly, however, alcohol is converted in the body to lactic acid which interferes with the removal of uric acid from the body by the kidneys.

While it is certainly possible for people with gout to remain well without becoming teetotal, reduction in alcohol consumption is very important particularly if you are drinking more than the recommended healthy limit of 21 units per week for men or 14
units per week for women.(Recommended by UK society for Gout)
1 unit of alcohol is provided by:
•½ pint of standard strength (3-4% alcohol by volume) beer, lager or
cider
•125ml glass of wine (11%, 100ml glass of stronger wine)
•Single measure of spirits (25ml)
•Single measure of sherry or fortified wine (50ml)
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